Category Archives: New

Get the Prince of Persia Pack for $10, Rayman Series for $10, and more.

Digital games retailer GOG.com is sending off its Winter sale with a 48 hour finale that brings back two weeks worth of daily bundles.

The Big Winter Sale Finale, which started this morning, has Divinity: Original Sin for a 33 percent discount, bringing it down to $32, as well as 24 bundles like:

The Ultimate D&D Collection (includes 10 games like Baldur’s Gate, Icewind Dale) — $21
Prince of Persia Pack — $10
Stalker Zone (Includes the three Stalker games) — $12.47
Fantasy Quests (includes the King’s Quest games) — $8
Anomaly Detected (includes Anomaly 2 and the rest of the series) — $9
The Witcher Tag Team — $4.48
Heroes of Might and Magic Series — $17.44
Sid Meier’s Pack — $5.95
Rayman Series — $10
FPS Icons (includes Unreal Tournament 2004, Duke Nukem 3D, and others) — $6.36
GOG.com turned six years old in September this year. For more on how the site evolved from a niche online platform for classic games and plans for the near future, check out our interview with managing director Guillaume Rambourg.

Auctions are back!

Update: Valve has restored Steam’s Holiday Auction event and posted the following note:

“On Thursday Dec 11th we had an issue with Gems that meant we needed to reset the Auction and start over. We apologize for the interruption. Any placed bids will need to be placed again.

All Gems created by you have been returned to your Inventory
All Gem purchases from the Community Market have been reimbursed. View your Store Transactions to see the Wallet Credit to your account.
All previous Auction bids have been canceled and the Auction has been reset.
Additionally, anyone who traded away items in exchange for Steam Gems on the first day of bidding will receive a copy of Counter-Strike: Global Offensive in their Inventory.”
The Auction will run from December 15 7:45 a.m. to December 18 10:00 a.m., when Valve confirmed the Steam Holiday Sale will start.

The original story appears below.

Valve has closed its Holiday Auction just hours after the promotion went live, after it quickly emerged that some users were exploiting the system.

Some 100 copies of two thousand Steam games were due to go up for auction from December 15, meaning there were 200,000 games ready to bid on. What made this promotion unique is that users wouldn’t need to bid with money, but instead Steam Gems, which can be acquired by deleting various sundry items such as trading cards and badges.

Those who play games on Steam will have noticed they accrue such items just by buying and playing games, meaning that how many gems each person owns is supposed to reflect their dedication.

However, hours after the auction went live, some users discovered a way of exploiting the system via trading, while other users appear to have found ways to duplicate their own gem currency. One user, for example, was discovered on Reddit to have obtained 1.9 billion gems, which is theoretically enough to win every auction.

Valve has elected to delete that person’s gem inventory, and due to the exploitable nature of the promotion, has suspended it.

“Sorry, but there have been some issues with Gems and the Steam Holiday Auction has been temporarily closed,” the company wrote on its auction website.

“The elves are working frantically to get the issues sorted out, and the auction will start again as soon as they’re done.”

Get Dragon Age: Inquisition for $40, Sunset Overdrive for $40, and more.

The Microsoft store has the best new deal this weekend so far, but it won’t be available until tomorrow. Starting at 8 a.m. ET on December 13, you’ll be able to get the Xbox One versions Call of Duty: Advanced Warfare and Destiny for just $30 each.

Best Buy still has a “buy two games, get a third free” deal on a huge selection of PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PlayStation 3, Xbox 360, and PC games, including Far Cry 4, Dragon Age: Inquisition, and many more.

Below you’ll find the rest of today’s best deals divided by platform:

PlayStation 4

Sony still has a $400 PlayStation 4 bundle that includes one out of four games: Destiny, NBA2K15, Far Cry 4, or LittleBigPlanet 3.

It’s also the second week of holiday sales on the PlayStation Store, with new deals every week.

Some highlights from the second week of offers:

Another World – 20th Anniversary Edition — $5.59
Assassin’s Creed Freedom Cry — $7.50
Octodad: Dadliest Catch — $9
Strider — $9
Trials Fusion — $12
Valiant Hearts: The Great War — $9
Other PS4 games deals:

Grand Theft Auto V — $49 (Ebay)
Dragon Age: Inquisition — $40 (Amazon)
Driveclub — $35 (Amazon)
Wolfenstein: The New Order — $25 (Amazon)
Watch Dogs — $30 (Amazon)
The Evil Within — $35 (Amazon)
Destiny — $51.28 (Amazon)
Rocksmith — $40 (Amazon)
The LEGO Movie Videogame — $25 (Amazon)
The Last of Us Remastered — $22 (Amazon)
LittleBigPlanet 3 — $40 (Ebay)
Battlefield 4 — $29 (Walmart)
Killzone: Shadow Fall — $27.39 (Amazon)
Tomb Raider: Definitive Edition — $25 (Amazon)
LEGO Batman 3: Beyond Gotham — $40 (Amazon)
LEGO The Hobbit — $30 (Amazon)
Call of Duty: Ghosts Hardened Edition — $45 (Amazon)
Get a $10 credit when you add $60 to your PSN account with PayPal.

Newegg has the DualShock 4 for $40.

Xbox One

GameStop has the Xbox One Assassin’s Creed Unity Bundle for $350

Sunset Overdrive — $40 (GameStop)
Grand Theft Auto V — $49 (Ebay)
Forza Horizon 2 — $35 (Dell)
Forza 5 — $35 (Dell)
Dead Rising 3 — $35 (Dell)
Just Dance 2014 — $20 (Amazon)
Xbox One Stereo Headset — $50 (Amazon)
Xbox One controller — $30 (Sears, in store only)
Shadow Warrior — $29 (Amazon)
Destiny — $51.28 (Amazon)
Dragon Age: Inquisition — $40 (Amazon)
Ryse: Son of Rome — $35 (Dell)
Tomb Raider: Definitive Edition — $25 (Amazon)
LEGO Batman 3: Beyond Gotham — $40 (Amazon)
LEGO The Hobbit — $30 (Amazon)
Call of Duty: Ghosts Hardened Edition — $45 (Amazon)
This week’s Deals with Gold offer includes:

Peggle 2 – $4.80
Plants vs. Zombies: Garden Warfare – $13.20
However, keep in mind that Garden Warfare and Peggle 2 are free with a $5/month or $30 year membership to EA Access. We also have a list of Xbox 360 Deals with Gold.

PC

Call of Duty: Advanced Warfare’s multiplayer is free to play this weekend and priced down to $45 on Steam.

You can get all the Batman Arkham games and DLC for just $10 from Bundle Stars.

Humble Bundle has kicked off its Winter Sale, with discounts on more than 500 games. The store will host 48-hour deals, 12-hour flash sales, and additional offers yet to be revealed over the course of the Winter Sale. Some great deals available right now include Shadow Warrior for $4, Valkyria Chronicles for $15, and The Walking Dead: Season 2 for $8.49.

You can get SimCity 2000 for free from Origin.

GOG.com has kicked off its 2014 DRM-free Winter Sale, with discounts on over 750 games including Luftrausers for $2.

Green Man Gaming is offering a 20 percent discount on digital games with the code 726B15-MPNMO3-FJLGSJ. The online store also kicked off its 12 Days of Festive Deals, starting with a 75 percent discount on the Batman Arkham games. New deals will be introduced each day until December 23.

Uplay has a buy one, get one free sale on Assassin’s Creed Unity, Far Cy 4, Watch Dogs, and many others.

Middle-earth: Shadow of Mordor — $33.49 (GMG)
Star Wars Battlefront II — $3 (Steam)
Metro 2033 Redux — $12.50 (Steam)
Metro: Last Light Redux — $12.50 (Steam)
Plants vs. Zombies: Garden Warfare — $15 (Amazon)
Killing Floor — $5 (Steam)
A Story About My Uncle — $3.24 (Steam)
Bioshock — $5 (GMG)
The Darkness II — $7.49 (GMG)
XCOM: Enemy Unknown — $7.49 (GMG)
Spec Ops: The Line — $6 (GMG)
The Bureau: XCOM Declassified — $5 (GMG)
Bioshock — $6.59 (GMG)
Bioshock Infinite — $7.49 (GMG)
3DS

Best Buy has the 3DS XL for $150.

PS Vita

GameStop has the PS Vita Borderlands 2 Limited Edition Bundle for $170. Amazon also matched the price on the same bundle.

Hardware

Samsung 28-Inch Ultra High Definition LED Monitor — $530 (Amazon)

Logitech G700s — $50 (Amazon)

Humanitarian group UNICEF stuns a crowd with a fake game pitch about the all-too-real suffering of people in South Sudan.

In a bid to raise awareness for quality of life in the South Sudan, UNICEF recently published a concept for a disturbing game where you play a seven-year-old girl facing all manner of hardship and trials.

The premise for the fake game, Elika’s Escape, sees players control a little girl whose mother dies of cholera and brother killed for his attempts to protect you. You escape, but a bullet grazes your infant baby brother.

“We are taking the level of horror in this game even to infants,” a presenter says.

Once you make it to a refugee camp, things aren’t much better. The stench of sewage permeates the area, and you become so desperate that you consider prostitution to help make money to feed your family.

The premise for this game was so troubling to some attendees at a Washington DC event where it was pitched that they walked out in disgust. But that was kind of the point.

“What’s too much for a video game is happening daily to children in South Sudan,” the video above says.

Mari Malek, a South Sudan refugee herself, added that while Elika’s Escape the game may be a work of fiction, the plight in the region is too real. “Elika’s story is true,” Malek says. “She is me, and she is so many of the South Sudanese children that are going through this experience at this moment.”

UNICEF is a humanitarian group that aims to improve the lives of young people around the world by promoting education and taking measures to combat disease and suffering wherever it is.

“Goodgame will remain organizationally the same,” Twitch confirms.

Video game streaming service Twitch has acquired GoodGame, a talent and content agency which works with the esports and live video game broadcasting communities. The news was announced today on the Twitch Blog. GoodGame is well known for its professional gaming teams Evil Geniuses and Alliance.

GoodGame CEO Alexander Garfield explained in an announcement, “I’d like to think that GoodGame could play a role in helping get everyone on the same page. We understand things from the team’s perspective; the player’s perspective; the tournament’s perspective. We’ve run many different kinds of esports projects, and we know what it takes to make them successful and sustainable. But at the same time, up until now our company’s been just as consumed as everyone else by the day-to-day demands of running a business in a very competitive industry – and it’s limited our ability to look out for everyone and think as altruistically as we’d like. That’s why I decided to align us with Twitch.”

GameSpot reached out to Twitch for comment on how the acquisition would affect GoodGame, and a representative confirmed, “Goodgame will remain organizationally the same and they will continue to run their agency and represent clients and sponsors alike.”

Earlier this year Twitch was acquired by Amazon in a $1 billion deal, following speculations that YouTube would acquire the site. Twitch is the largest live-streaming website in the United States by a wide margin, according to a report released this spring, and has expanded into non-gaming ventures, such as streaming concerts. Amazon has become aggressive about gaining a foothold in the video game industry, attracting talent like the designers of Portal and Far Cry and purchasing Killer Instinct developer Double Helix Games.

PC – Best Games of 2014 Nominees

ar in and year out, the PC remains home to the most diverse array of games available. Even as consoles still find their footing in the digital sales space, the PC sets the standard for finding interesting and amazing games with just a few clicks. It was a year of tall tales–both the kind that arise from intricate game mechanics, and the kind that storytellers weave when crafting intriguing characters and believable dialogue.

Several of our nominees for 2014′s PC Game of the Year do both. Dragon Age: Inquisition and Middle-earth: Shadow of Mordor both draw you into their narratives using traditional storytelling, but then allow you to create stories of your own through the decisions you make on and off the battlefield. Other nominees, however, are more focused. The Vanishing of Ethan Carter, for instance, teases you with the supernatural, hiding within its incredible beauty moments of fear and sadness. Divinity: Original Sin, on the other hand, is an excellent example of how game mechanics can drive an entire adventure. Every step you take, every grave you rob, every slash you make may result in repercussions you should have expected had you not been in such a hurry. Hearthstone: Heroes of Warcraft, meanwhile, hides considerable depth beneath its user-friendly facade. The stories it inspires are the kind you tell around the water cooler, where you recount close card battles while marveling about the cards you’ve most recently earned.

The greatest story of all, of course, is that console wars come and console wars go, but it’s the stalwart PC that is most likely to fulfill your need for epic journeys you remember for years, even after memories of lesser games fade into the background.

Have some Christmas shopping to do? Best Buy is currently running a good deal on games.

Retailer Best Buy has launched a Buy 2, Get 1 video game sales promotion good for all Xbox and PlayStation, and PC titles. It’s simple: buy two games and get the third free. The only limitation is that the deal does not apply to Wii U, 3DS, or PlayStation Vita titles, nor is it good for preorders.

The sales promo is available at Best Buy’s website or in-store through December 13. Head to Best Buy’s website to start shopping for yourself of someone on your Christmas list.

In other gaming deals news, Microsoft has announced this week’s Xbox One and Xbox 360 deals for Xbox Live members.

Are you picking up any new games this week? Let us know in the comments below!

Ralph Baer, creator of the Magnavox Odyssey, has passed away.

Ralph Baer, the creator of the first home video game console, has passed away, Gamasutra reports.

Baer developed the Brown Box in 1966, which he later licensed to Magnavox, where it became the Magnavox Odyssey released in 1972. Baer is also responsible for the first video game peripheral, the light gun, and the electronic memory game Simon.

Baer received the National Medal of Technology from President George W. Bush in 2006, the 2008 Game Developers Choice Pioneer Award, and many other honors.

“Had I listened to all those people 40 years ago who were telling me to stop the nonsense or made remarks like ‘are you still screwing around with this stuff?” And hadn’t proceeded, we might all not be here today,” Baer said when he received his Pioneer Award. “Certainly things might have been different.”

Get Wolfenstein: The New Order for $20, Broken Age for $8.50, and more.

Steam’s sale in celebration of tonight’s Game Awards 2014 event in Las Vegas has the best new deals of the day, with South Park: The Stick of Truth for $14, Wolfenstein: The New Order for $20, Broken Age for $8.50, and more.

Below you’ll find the rest of today’s best deals divided by platform:

PlayStation 4

Sony has kicked off four weeks of holiday sales on the PlayStation Store, with new deals every week. Here are some highlights from the first week of offers:

Tomb Raider: Definitive Edition — $18
Oddworld: New ‘n’ Tasty — $21
Strike Suit Zero: Director’s Cut — $12
The LEGO Movie Videogame — $30
Wolfenstein: The New Order — $36
You can find the full list of PlayStation Store discounts here.

Assassin’s Creed: Unity and Black Flag — $30 (Slickdeals)
Destiny — $45 (Amazon)
Lords of the Fallen — $40 (Amazon)
The Last of Us Remastered — $18 (Amazon)
LittleBigPlanet 3 — $40 (Ebay)
Battlefield 4 — $26 (Walmart)
Killzone: Shadow Fall — $25 (Amazon)
Call of Duty: Ghosts Hardened Edition — $46 (Amazon)
Xbox One

GameStop has the Xbox One Assassin’s Creed Unity Bundle for $350

Xbox One Stereo Headset — $50 (Amazon)
Shadow Warrior — $20 (Amazon)
Need for Speed Rivals: Complete Edition — $40 (Amazon)
Destiny — $45 (Amazon)
Lords of the Fallen — $40 (Amazon)
Dragon Age: Inquisition — $47.25 (Amazon)
Call of Duty: Ghosts Hardened Edition — $46 (Amazon)
Additionally, this week’s Games with Gold includes:

Metro 2033 Redux — $16.74
Metro Last Light Redux — $16.74
Metro Redux Bundle — $33.16
PC

Steam is holding a sale in conjunction with tonight’s Game Awards 2014 event in Las Vegas. Some highlights from the sale:

Valiant Hearts: The Great War — $6
The Vanishing of Ethan Carter — $12
South Park: The Stick of Truth — $14
Trials Fusion — $10
The Wolf Among Us — $9
Transistor — $10
Divinity: Original Sin — $27
Wolfenstein: The New Order — $20
Broken Age — $8.50
GOG.com has kicked off its 2014 DRM-free Winter Sale, with discounts on over 750 games including Luftrausers for $2 and Broken Age for $10. You can also download a free copy of Age of Wonders while supplies last.

Green Man Gaming is offering a 20 percent discount on digital games including Telltale’ Game of Thrones with the code 53NSRB-GTOJQD-8WN7GJ.

Uplay has a buy one, get one free sale on Assassin’s Creed Unity, Far Cy 4, Watch Dogs, and many others.

Pay what you want for the Humble Sega Bundle which includes games like NiGHTS Into Dreams, Empire: Total War, and the Dreamcast Collection.

Steam’s weekend deal discounts Disney’s catalog, including Split/Second for $10, Pure for $10, and Tron: Evolution for $10.

Steam’s other weekend deal discounts Daedalic Entertainment’s catalog, including Blackguards for $10 and Deponia: The Complete Journey for $16.

Xenonauts — $16.74 (Steam)
Call of Duty: Ghosts — $10 (Amazon)
Sleeping Dogs: Definitive Edition — $15 (Amazon)
Wii U

Save $10 when you spend more than $35 on Amiibo at Toys R Us

3DS

The Legend of Zelda: A Link Between Worlds — $20 (Kmart)

Bravely Default — $20 (Kmart)
Mario Party: Island Tour — $15 (Kmart)
Mario Golf: World Tour — $15 (Kmart)
Yoshi’s New Island — $20 (Kmart, in store only)
Hardware

Logitech G700s — $50 (Amazon)
AMD FX-6300 6-Core Processor Black Edition — $90 (Amazon)
AMD FX-8350 FX-Series 8-Core Black Edition Processor — $150 (Amazon)

Q&A: 2K hires LucasArts veteran Haden Blackman to head up Hangar 13; work begins on super-secret next-generation AAA game that uses proprietary tech.

Borderlands and Civilization publisher 2K Games today announced the formation of Hangar 13, a brand new, San Francisco-based developer led by Star Wars games veteran Haden Blackman, who spent more than a decade at LucasArts in the 1990s and 2000s.

2K has big plans for Hangar 13, but the publisher isn’t giving much in the way of specifics just yet about the studio’s first game. All we know is that Hangar 13 is working on a AAA “next generation title,” one that will allow players to “shape their own experiences.” The developer even teases that the choices you make in the game will impact moment-to-moment gameplay, as well as the the entire gameworld itself, including characters and narrative. Sounds interesting. Blackman told us more.

“The idea there is we want to make sure the players feel like they’re contributing to the overall experience,” Blackman said. “The player story and the player experience, not just the narrative, at both the micro level–the moment-to-moment choices they make–to the macro as well. How am I affecting the world, how am I impacting the characters around me. How does that in turn change my gameplay experience.”

“So that’s the biggest thing for me; making sure we get back to the spirit of why I got into games in the first place, which is this idea that it’s an interactive medium and I could be a co-author of the experience in some way,” he added. “And I feel like we only scratched the surface at LucasArts and now here I have an opportunity to really blow that out over time and make that our hallmark.”

Making this possible is Hangar 13′s proprietary technology, which comprises the game engine and various developer tools. On top of that, Blackman says Hangar 13 has hired an “all-star” team of professionals who have worked on such franchises as Dead Space, Assassin’s Creed, Splinter Cell, and Star Wars to help the project really, truly sing.

We spoke with Blackman about Hangar 13, but were told the studio isn’t planning to give official details about its first game for some time. We also asked if Hangar 13′s game was a new IP or based on an existing franchise, but Blackman wouldn’t budge.

You can poke around Hangar 13′s newly launched website to look for more information. Let us know what you find.

Though details about Hangar 13′s first game are being kept under wraps for now, we do know a lot more about the man leading the studio. Blackman spent 13 years at LucasArts, working in a variety of roles on games such as Knights of the Old Republic, Star Wars: The Force Unleashed, and MMO Star Wars Galaxies. Blackman later left Lucas to co-found Fearless Studios, an independent outfit that was later acquired by Kabam. He worked there for around a year as the company’s general manager, working on The Hobbit mobile titles.

To go a little deeper into what Hangar 13 is all about, we caught up with Blackman and picked his brain about the origins of the studio and what it aims to achieve. Again, we were told that Blackman could not discuss the studio’s debut project. With that caveat out of the way, below are some highlights from our interview.

Where Does the Name Hangar 13 Come From?

“A lot of the 2K studios are named after where they were founded. So we are actually in a series of buildings called the hangars, up here in Novator. They’re refurbished military airforce hangars that have been turned into development space. But there is no hangar 13. So for us, we picked that specifically for a couple reasons. One, to hearken back to the fact that it is a hangar and we were founded in a hangar, but it gives us the freedom to kind of move between the hangars without causing any confusion. And, most importantly, because there is no hangar 13, it’s kind of mysterious. It’s like the hidden hangar. And we’re working on a top secret project here, so we felt like it was fitting. I also like the superstition part of it as well.”

“I know everybody by name and by face on the team, which for me is a big deal and I want to always keep it that way.” — Haden Blackman
How Many People Are Working at Hangar 13 Right Now?

“We’re not talking direct numbers right now in terms of our team size. I’d say we’re large enough to get all the work done that we need to get done on a milestone by milestone basis, but we’re still small enough that we’re nimble and we communicate fairly well across the team. I know everybody by name and by face on the team, which for me is a big deal and I want to always keep it that way.”

Challenges In Starting a New Studio?

“The biggest challenge is always hiring. We want to find the best people; we want to draw from across the industry. We’ve been trying to build a leadership team in particular that has come from a number of different studios and has worked on a wide variety of games in a lot of different genres. Hiring, and making sure we’re bringing people from a diverse backgrounds is always a challenge.”

More About That Mysterious Proprietary Tech

“One of the reasons I came here is because of a willingness to build proprietary tech. The 20 or so games I’ve worked on in my career, all but one have been built on proprietary tech. And for me that’s incredibly exciting; it’s very liberating. It allows us to essentially build the tech that we need for the vision of the game and not try to shoehorn or retrofit a game vision into tech, or overhaul existing tech to fit a game vision. That’s obviously not without its challenges, too. Building tech from the ground up is incredibly exciting but it can also be challenging for people, so that’s one of the things that we’re really focused on right now.”

“It’s the engine, it’s the tools, the pipelines, the workflows. Obviously, certain pieces of it might be off-the-shelf pieces or licensed tech that go into that. But the renderer, the game engine itself, everything that is driving the game systems, and game logic, and the tools, and the pipelines, and workflows are all homegrown and built from the ground up here.”

Lessons Learned from Past Jobs

“I had a really great experience at Lucas for the vast majority of the time there. I think, for me, the importance of investing in tech up front, was a hard-won lesson from Lucas. And making sure we’re putting just as much emphasis on the tech design and hiring for that. I think the other big learning for me, personally, I really want to work on games that I want to play. So working at Lucas, again, was a dream come true because we were working with Star Wars which is an IP that I love. And we were making the types of games that I enjoy playing. But over time, what became obvious to me was I really wanted to build games that allowed much more player authorship and making the player the co-author of the experience. So our mantra here is ‘every player’s story is unique.’”

“I want to live up to the expectations of 2K and make sure that we are delivering at the quality bar that they set.” — Haden Blackman
“The idea there is we want to make sure the players feel like they’re contributing to the overall experience. The player story and the player experience, not just the narrative, at both the micro level–the moment-to-moment choices they make–to the macro as well. How am I affecting the world, how am I impacting the characters around me. How does that in turn change my gameplay experience. So that’s the biggest thing for me; making sure we get back to the spirit of why I got into games in the first place, which is this idea that it’s an interactive medium and I could be a co-author of the experience in some way. And I feel like we only scratched the surface at LucasArts and now here I have an opportunity to really blow that out over time and make that our hallmark.”

Lot of Pressure to Live Up to Take-Two and 2K’s Great Track Record?

“I want to live up to the expectations of 2K and make sure that we are delivering at the quality bar that they set. But that’s the reason why I came here. Every time I’ve made a change in my career, it’s always been driven by what can I learn and where can I go to work in an environment where quality is of paramount importance. That isn’t the case everywhere, and that hasn’t always been the case in my career. And I think, being able to come here [to 2K] is a huge opportunity because 2K does have that laser focus on quality and the game itself drives every conversation. Everybody’s marching after the same thing, which is the highest quality game possible. And I never feel like there’s any distractions from that, or weird politics, or anything that distracts from that quest for quality. Probably the number one reason I came here was because of that.”

Why He Left Mobile for AAA

“I spent about a year at Kabam in San Francisco, which does fantastic free-to-play and mobile games. And I learned a ton. That was an opportunity for me to learn and learn about that space. And what I discovered about myself is I have to work on games that I am passionate about, and those are the games that I enjoy playing. Games that I enjoy playing are games that offer more immersive experiences, and we’re just not quite there yet on mobile from my standpoint. Not to say that there’s not any out there, but for me, most of them are on console and PC. And that’s the space I wanted to be back in. And when the opportunity to come to 2K to start a studio and start a studio building console and PC games emerged, I jumped at it, because I really wanted to get back to making the games that I loved to play.”

Lessons Learned In Mobile Space That Can Translate to Console?

“Absolutely. Even though we’re talking about dramatically different team sizes, that nimbleness and that ability to shift gears quickly, is something that we’re trying to infuse here. There’s a lot of focus on getting things up and running on screen as quickly as possible. We had it to some degree at LucasArts, but not nearly what I see in the mobile space. So we try and champion that here and really focus on getting something up and running on screen and then iterate on it. I think that in the mobile space a lot of companies do a great job of onboarding players with tutorializing things, with introducing players to mechanics and concepts in a very engaging way. So we’re obviously looking at that and learning from that wherever we can. I really think that it’s dangerous … for either side to look at it and say ‘There’s nothing to learn from those types of developers’ Because I think those guys have a ton to learn from each other. Over time, the experiences will probably converge. We’re not quite there yet, but I definitely learned a ton in my time in that space that we’re applying to what we’re doing here.”

The Culture of Hangar 13

“We are building a new culture here with this studio. Every studio is unique in its own way, and as we evolve over time that culture will evolve as well. A lot of it will have to do with the people that come on board. So now is a good time to join because you can be part of setting the foundation for the studio going forward. In terms of things like specifics around our culture, we are trying to be … one of our pillars is we’re decisive. We make and we own decisions. That helps us provide a lot of clarity to the team. Which hopefully reduces the churn and things like wasted work, which I think can lead to slippages, which then lead to crunch. Everybody in the games industry works hard. We’re no exception. We work hard because we’re passionate about building games, and we’re passionate about what we’re doing and we want to make the best games that we possible can.

“I also believe that there are diminishing returns to extended crunch, and we’re trying to be sane about that, and we’re trying to plan in advance. And we’re trying to build buffers into our schedules and make sure that people know when we’ll be pushing a little bit harder and when we’re gonna be taking a step back to focus on what we’ve just done and re-asses and iterate. And I think that’s worked out pretty well over the last several months. The feedback that we’re getting from everybody on the team is that it’s been very measured and very predictable, which is good. I can’t stress enough that providing that clarity to the team; being decisive and providing that clarity does a ton to cut down on that churn. But then one of our other pillars is we push each other to be the best that we can possibly be at our jobs. People are working hard, too, because everybody wants to do their best work and not let the rest of the team down.”

Would Hangar 13 Consider Adopting Emerging Tech Like VR?

“Right now, we’re focused on the core experience. But we haven’t ruled anything out. We’re always watching everything that’s being developed, and trying to see how it might impact–or improve and enhance–the vision that we’re working on right now, the game design that we’re working on right now. We haven’t ruled anything out. But we’re really focused right now on the world that we’re building, the mechanics that we want to bring to the fore, and the narrative, and our overarching game structure. Those are the core things that we’re really focused on right now.”